FUJIFILM'S REBUTTAL ON PRICE COMPARISONS



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


On December 21, 1995, Fujifilm submitted survey data that demonstrated the absence of what Kodak calls a "distribution bottleneck" in Japan's photographic materials market. Today, we submit a paper that demonstrates the invalidity of Kodak's price fixing conspiracy theory.

One major part of rebutting Kodak's price fixing theory is disproving the allegation that prices in Japan are twice as high as prices in the United States. Kodak claims that this supposed price disparity is evidence that the Japanese market for film is closed to competition -- at least outside the admittedly competitive "shark tanks" of Tokyo and Osaka. Kodak has produced a nice soundbite with its "twice as high" allegation; the problem is that, if one undertakes proper comparisons, the allegation just isn't true.

In this submission, Fujifilm provides several pieces of new information that confirm that retail film prices in Japan are comparable to prices in the United States; moreover, we show that this phenomenon is true throughout Japan. Specifically, we demonstrate that:

The bottom line is that Kodak's analysis lacks credibility. Proper price comparisons and stability analyses prove Kodak wrong. USTR needs to realize this before relying on Kodak's half-baked "facts."


TABLE OF CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

DISCUSSION

CONCLUSION


*Please click title to download document.

Portable Document Format (Full Text)*** (122 KB)

Portable Document Format (Figure)*** (308 KB)



*** Note:Please use Free Acrobat Reader Software through www.adobe.com when you read.


[Footer]

[Film Case Homepage]